STORIES

  • LOST FREEDOM
    LOST FREEDOM
    Over two million people are incarcerated in the United States, many for drug crimes, with thousands serving life sentences with no possibility of parole...
  • LOST LIVES
    LOST LIVES
    Thousands of people are seriously injured, maimed, or killed as a result of the Drug War every year...
  • LOST PROPERTY
    LOST PROPERTY
    Thousands of people lose their homes, cars or other property as a result of the War on Drugs every year..
  • LOST JOBS
    LOST JOBS
    Thousands of people lose their jobs or must abandon careers because of the Drug War every year...
  • LOST FAMILIES
    LOST FAMILIES
    The "collateral" suffering of friends, partners, spouses, mothers, fathers, daughters, and sons...
  • LOST EDUCATIONS
    LOST EDUCATIONS
    200,000 students in the United States have lost the ability to get educational assistance because of the Drug War...
  • DRUG WAR WARRIORS
    DRUG WAR WARRIORS
    People and organizations fighting to end the Drug War

Highlighting the suffering caused by the Drug War through the stories of its casualties.

Every year, a million and a half people are arrested in the United States for drug crimes as part of the War on Drugs.  Millions are incarcerated to languish, and often die, in prison.  Millions of careers and jobs are lost.  Millions of lives are destroyed.  Millions of educations are abandoned.  Millions of families are torn apart … and millions of children (and adults) are crying.  Trillions of dollars are wasted or never earned.  Thousands are killed.

There are millions of stories to tell.

There’s Robert Jones, a 70 year old cancer patient and licensed medical marijuana user crying when HUD terminated his housing subsidy.  There’s Jose Guereña, a two-tour Iraqi Vet shot at 61 times in 7 seconds after SWAT Police burst into his home on a drug warrant (no drugs were found).  And Jose Guereña’s children crying for their father.  There’s Pinkney Clowers, serving a sentence of life without the possibility of parole for allegedly running a “continuing criminal enterprise” to sell crack while he was between the ages of 15 and 19 – meanwhile, all the other co-defendants have been free for years because they testified against him (even those who had been accused of murder!).  There’s Joe Jackson sentenced to life without parole for selling meth in order to pay for his son’s life saving medical care after his health insurance company terminated their coverage. There’s Kevin Ott serving life without parole in Oklahoma for 3.5 ounces of meth.  There is Michael Pelletier, a paraplegic serving life without the possibility of parole for marijuana.  And Craig Cesal serving life for marijuana.  And John Knock serving life for marijuana… There are thousands of people serving life in prison for non-violent drug crimes.  There are millions in jail or on probation.  There are millions of children suffering.  All because of the criminalization and prohibition of drugs as part of the Drug War.

There are millions of stories to tell.

Thankfully, there are also warriors fighting against the Drug War.  There are people like Beth Curtis, John Knock’s sister, who founded Life For Pot to fight to free Pot Prisoners.  There’s Amy Povah,  sentenced to 24 years in prison for conspiracy because of her former husband’s ecstasy manufacturing business before President Clinton granted her clemency, who has since devoted her life since to seeking clemency for others.  There’s Mark Osler, a former prosecutor, now, compelled by his Christian values, to fiercely and tirelessly advocate for clemency.

There are millions of stories to tell.

Drug War Stories will share the stories of the casualties of the Drug War including those who have lost their freedomlost jobs or careers, lost property, lost educational opportunities, or who have lost their lives.  It will share the stories of their families and friends, mothers and fathers, and daughters and sons.  It will share the stories of those trying to end the madness of injustice.